Pagan Osborne raises £4000 for Alzheimer Scotland

The Pagan Osborne team

Legal, financial and property specialist Pagan Osborne has raised £4000 for its nominated charity Alzheimer Scotland in the first year of a three-year partnership.

Employees from Pagan Osborne’s Fife and Edinburgh offices have taken part in a number of fundraising initiatives in the past year including the Memory Walk, a quiz evening, team lunches and, most recently, the inflatable obstacle course Gung Ho.

Alzheimer Scotland was chosen in a staff vote and the company is aiming to raise a total of £12,000.

Jennifer Lowry, human resources manager and leader of the Make a Difference team at Pagan Osborne, said:

“We have had great fun finding new and imaginative ways to raise funds for this more worthy of causes in the past year. Our clients, colleagues, friends and families have all been incredibly generous and we will continue to work hard to meet our fundraising target.

“It is estimated one million people in the UK will be living with dementia within 10 years and there are more than 90,000 people in Scotland already affected by the condition. On both personal and professional levels, many of us have seen first-hand how dementia impacts lives. That is why we are so passionate about our partnership with this fantastic organisation.”

Maureen Thom, dementia engagement manager at Alzheimer Scotland, added:

“I have been so impressed with the way that Pagan Osborne staff have thrown themselves (literally in the case of the Gung Ho challenge) into fundraising for our support services. I can’t wait to see what they come up with over the next two years. But it’s not just about the fundraising – by choosing to support Alzheimer Scotland they are also raising awareness of dementia, and the support our charity can offer, with their clients, their families and the communities where they work.”

Alzheimer Scotland depends on fundraised income to maintain and develop its vital work and services, which aim to improve quality of life for the 90,000 people in Scotland living with dementia.